24 days in East Asia Itinerary

24 days in East Asia Itinerary

Created using Inspirock Japan itinerary planner

Make it your trip
Fly
1
Tokyo
— 1 night
Train
2
Hiroshima
— 4 nights
Train
3
Kyoto
— 3 nights
Train
4
Kanazawa
— 2 nights
Fly
5
Sapporo
— 5 nights
Fly
6
Akita
— 2 nights
Train
7
Tokyo
— 4 nights
Fly

S M T W T F S
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18
19
20
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23
24
25
26
27
28
29
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31
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9
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13

Tokyo

— 1 night
Tokyo holds the status of most populous metropolitan area in the world--a fact you'll find tangible as you walk the bustling streets and explore its diverse neighborhoods and cultures.
Start off your visit on the 18th (Mon): wander the streets of Asakusa, admire the masterpieces at Mori Art Museum, and then wander the streets of Takeshita Street.

To see traveler tips, more things to do, photos, and tourist information, you can read our Tokyo day trip site.

Manchester, UK to Tokyo is an approximately 17.5-hour flight. The time zone difference moving from Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) to Japan Standard Time (JST) is 9 hours. When traveling from Manchester in July, plan for a bit warmer days in Tokyo, with highs around 36°C, while nights are much warmer with lows around 27°C. Finish your sightseeing early on the 19th (Tue) so you can travel to Hiroshima.

Things to do in Tokyo

Neighborhoods · Shopping · Museums
Find places to stay Jul 17 — 19:

Hiroshima

— 4 nights

City of Peace

Grapple with history and appreciate modernity in Hiroshima, a city known around the world for its tragic past and inspiring rebirth.
Venture out of the city with trips to Hatsukaichi (Itsukushima Gekijyo, Itsukushima Shrine, &more). The adventure continues: take an in-depth tour of Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum, pause for some photo ops at Memorial Tower to the Mobilized Students, don't miss a visit to Peace Memorial Park - Hiroshima, and contemplate the long history of Atomic Bomb Dome.

For ratings, photos, reviews, and more tourist information, read our Hiroshima online journey builder.

Getting from Tokyo to Hiroshima by flight takes about 4.5 hours. Other options: take a train; or drive. Expect a daytime high around 36°C in July, and nighttime lows around 28°C. Finish your sightseeing early on the 23rd (Sat) so you can take a train to Kyoto.

Things to do in Hiroshima

Historic Sites · Parks · Nature · Museums

Side Trip

Find places to stay Jul 19 — 23:

Kyoto

— 3 nights
The national capital for over a thousand years, Kyoto retains much of the charm of old Japan, boasting numerous temples and shrines that seem completely untouched by the modern world.
Kyoto is known for historic sites, shopping, and classes. Your plan includes some of its best attractions: steep yourself in history at Fushimi Inari-taisha Shrine, step into the grandiose world of Nijo Castle, contemplate in the serene atmosphere at Sanjusangendo Temple, and take a stroll through Gion.

To see photos, reviews, other places to visit, and more tourist information, you can read our Kyoto journey tool.

Traveling by train from Hiroshima to Kyoto takes 2.5 hours. Alternatively, you can drive; or take a bus. In July, plan for daily highs up to 37°C, and evening lows to 28°C. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 26th (Tue) so you can go by car to Kanazawa.

Things to do in Kyoto

Historic Sites · Neighborhoods · Museums · Shopping
Find places to stay Jul 23 — 26:

Kanazawa

— 2 nights
An old castle town largely unspoiled during World War II, Kanazawa features well-preserved architecture spread across a range of districts.
Get out of town with these interesting Kanazawa side-trips: Shirakawa-mura (Shirakawago Gassho Zukuri Minkaen, Wada House, &more). The adventure continues: admire the natural beauty at Kenrokuen Garden, admire the masterpieces at 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa, steep yourself in history at Nomura Family Samurai House, and contemplate in the serene atmosphere at Oyama Shrine.

For photos, reviews, where to stay, and tourist information, read Kanazawa online holiday builder.

You can drive from Kyoto to Kanazawa in 3 hours. Other options are to take a train; or take a bus. In July, plan for daily highs up to 34°C, and evening lows to 26°C. Finish your sightseeing early on the 28th (Thu) to allow enough time to travel to Sapporo.

Things to do in Kanazawa

Historic Sites · Parks · Museums · Neighborhoods

Side Trip

Find places to stay Jul 26 — 28:

Sapporo

— 5 nights

CIty of Ramen

A modern, bustling city known for its beer brewery, Sapporo attracts millions of visitors with its Snow Festival, during which elaborate ice and snow sculptures are exhibited all over town.
Change things up with these side-trips from Sapporo: Apple House (in Niki-cho), Otaru (Otaru Art Base, Otaru Canal, &more) and Hiyamizu Toge Karudera Viewing Platform (in Akaigawa-mura). Next up on the itinerary: relax in the rural setting at Asadaen Farm, steep yourself in history at Sapporo Clock Tower, head outdoors with Maruyama Hachijuhakksho Hiking Course, and contemplate in the serene atmosphere at Hokkaido Jingu.

To find more things to do, other places to visit, maps, and tourist information, go to the Sapporo road trip tool.

Getting from Kanazawa to Sapporo by flight takes about 5 hours. Other options: take a train; or drive. While traveling from Kanazawa, expect little chillier days and about the same nights in Sapporo, ranging from highs of 26°C to lows of 24°C. Finish up your sightseeing early on the 2nd (Tue) so you can travel to Akita.

Things to do in Sapporo

Parks · Historic Sites · Outdoors · Breweries & Distilleries

Side Trips

Find places to stay Jul 28 — Aug 2:

Akita

— 2 nights
The coastal city of Akita has gained a wider reputation for its Kanto Matsuri, or "pole lantern festival," where skilled performers balance long bamboo poles on their foreheads with glowing paper lanterns attached to the end.
Change things up with these side-trips from Akita: Semboku (Ishiguro Samurai House, Samurai District, &more). And it doesn't end there: take in nature's colorful creations at Senshu Park, explore the historical opulence of Kubota Castle, admire the striking features of Port Tower Selion, and see the interesting displays at Akita city Minzoku Geinou Densho-kan.

To see other places to visit and more tourist information, read Akita road trip app.

You can fly from Sapporo to Akita in 4 hours. Alternatively, you can take a train; or drive. Traveling from Sapporo in August, expect nights in Akita to be about the same, around 25°C, while days are somewhat warmer, around 32°C. Wrap up your sightseeing on the 4th (Thu) early enough to travel to Tokyo.

Things to do in Akita

Parks · Museums · Historic Sites · Nature

Side Trip

Find places to stay Aug 2 — 4:

Tokyo

— 4 nights
Step out of Tokyo with an excursion to Tokyo DisneySea in Maihama--about 40 minutes away. Explore Tokyo further: don't miss a visit to Meiji Jingu Shrine, wander the streets of Odaiba District, take in the spiritual surroundings of Senso-ji Temple, and stop by Akihabara.

To see more things to do, ratings, other places to visit, and more tourist information, you can read our Tokyo trip planner.

Traveling by flight from Akita to Tokyo takes 4.5 hours. Alternatively, you can take a train; or drive. While traveling from Akita, expect a bit warmer days and about the same nights in Tokyo, ranging from highs of 36°C to lows of 28°C. You will have some time to spend on the 9th (Tue) before leaving for home.

Things to do in Tokyo

Neighborhoods · Museums · Parks · Shopping

Side Trip

Find places to stay Aug 4 — 9:

Akita Prefecture travel guide

3.9
Specialty Museums · Bodies of Water · History Museums
Akita Prefecture is a prefecture located in the Tōhoku region of Japan. The capital is the city of Akita.HistoryThe area of Akita has been created from the ancient provinces of Dewa and Mutsu.Separated from the principal Japanese centres of commerce, politics, and population by several hundred kilometres and the Ōu and Dewa mountain ranges to the east, Akita remained largely isolated from Japanese society until after the year 600. Akita was a region of hunter-gatherers and principally nomadic tribes.The first historical record of what is now Akita Prefecture dates to 658, when the Abe no Hirafu conquered the native Ezo tribes at what are now the cities of Akita and Noshiro. Hirafu, then governor of Koshi Province (the northwest part of Honshū bordering the Sea of Japan), established a fort on the Mogami River, and thus began the Japanese settlement of the region.In 733, a new military settlement—later renamed Akita Castle—was built in modern-day Akita city at Takashimizu, and more permanent roads and structures were developed. The region was used as a base of operations for the Japanese empire as it drove the native Ezo people from northern Honshū.It shifted hands several times. During the Tokugawa shogunate it was appropriated to the Satake clan, who ruled the region for 260 years, developing the agriculture and mining industries that are still predominant today. Throughout this period, it was classified as part of Dewa Province. In 1871, during the Meiji Restoration, Dewa Province was reshaped and the old daimyō domains were abolished and administratively reconstructed, resulting in the modern-day borders of Akita.

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