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Trip Planner:   Asia  /  Nepal  /  Central Region  /  Bagmati Zone  /  Kathmandu Valley  /  Bhaktapur  /  Bhairavnath Temple

Bhairavnath Temple, Bhaktapur

4.5
#6 of 12 in Historic Sites in Bhaktapur
Religious Site · Hidden Gem · Tourist Spot
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  • another temple inside the darbar sq. huge and big and nice. under renovation now after the earthquake. 
    another temple inside the darbar sq. huge and big and nice. under renovation now after the earthquake.  more »
  • Bhairavnath Temple is excellent example of living art and architecture of the Bhaktapur,Nepal. I recommend the visitor travelling to Nepal to visit Bhairavnath Temple located besides the Bhaktapur... 
    Bhairavnath Temple is excellent example of living art and architecture of the Bhaktapur,Nepal. I recommend the visitor travelling to Nepal to visit Bhairavnath Temple located besides the Bhaktapur...  more »
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  • One of Bhaktapur's revered temples, Bhairavanath Temple, is located in Taumadhi Square, the city's main square. This Lord Bhairava temple is one of Bhaktapur's rectangular-based temples. This temple is immediately identifiable because it is located just behind the enormous Nyatapola temple. This temple's Bhairavanath is a powerful manifestation of Lord Shiva, who also goes by the names Kasi Vishwanath and Aakash Bhairava. He has a reputation for being obstinate and stubborn.
  • The Bhairavnath Temple stands on the east side of Bhaktapur's Taumadhi Square, southeast of the main Darbar square. Also known as the Kasi Biswonath or the Pantali mandir, it is a three-story, rectangular temple dedicated to the god Bhairav (Nasa Dyo), an incarnation of Shiva and the god of terror and infinite space. More specifically, according to Dowman, this particular temple is the residence of Akash Bhairav (the sky Bhairav) and is distinguishable from other manifestations of the same deity, such as the Akash Bhairav in Kathmandu. Bhairav has a particular fascination with machines and is often thought to inhabit wheels, with different versions of the god inhabiting different wheels on the same chariot. At the Bhairavnath temple, a chariot used in the annual Bisket-Jatra festival is stored, dismantled, against the temple's north wall. Around the Nepali new year per the Vikram Savat calendar—in March or April—the chariot is reassembled, and an image of Bhairav is installed within the chariot. Although the chariot, like the temple, is huge, the image of the god is a diminutive 30-centimeter head lacking a body. At festival time, competing teams from the town's upper quarter and the lower quarter meet in the large Taumadi square in front of the temple. According to Gutschow, the square is a sort of neutral zone where the opposing teams compete in a grand tug-of-war contest to pull the chariot toward one or the other sides of town. As the chariot is tugged in opposite directions, it advances slowly along the streets according to whichever team is strongest. In the end, regardless of whichever side "wins," the chariot is ultimately moved to the Yahsikhyah square on the south side of the city in time for New Year's Eve

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